Apr/15/14
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The way in which Elementary has dealt with telling the story of an addict is impressive—it’s one of the reasons why the show first caught my attention so early on. It wouldn’t have been surprising for the show to discard this particular string of narration after season one closed and stories were wrapped up neat and tidy so to continue to pursue it so far into its sophomore season is commendable.
Drug addiction is hardly ever dealt with in a manner befitting the disease but on this particular show it’s given the utmost attention and no matter how sloppy other stories may become, Sherlock’s battle with addiction and subsequent recovery remain in delicate, thoughtful hands……..
What would’ve the payoff been like had we’d been allowed to witness an interaction between Allistair and Sherlock before the former’s passing? Their relationship is one that lands in all of the pitfalls of telling not showing syndrome. We’re told how much Allistair cared for Sherlock, we’re told of their affection, of how Allistair was there for him when any other addict would find him a threat to their sobriety. However, the first face-to-face interaction that the friends have is after Allistair has already passed and Sherlock day-dreaming that he’s seeing him. It’s clear from the brief moments we share with these two that they have a capable chemistry and it just makes me wonder how powerful the character’s death could have been had we gotten to know him.
Ultimately, despite the death being more than anything a tool to refocus the story back on Sherlock’s sobriety it’s sold so well by Jonny Lee Miller that I’m hard pressed to nag all too much. Do I think that as an audience we require more insight into a character to be affected by their death? Yes. But I also think that Miller sold the grief and his onslaught of emotional conflicts so well that we care because Sherlock cares. Because at the end of the episode Sherlock is standing over the grave of one of his few friends, telling a ghost that he loves him and will always be missed.
- See more at: http://blastmagazine.com/entertainment/tv/elementary-lack-void-2x20-episode-review/#sthash.DNVL06Ry.dpuf
 

The way in which Elementary has dealt with telling the story of an addict is impressive—it’s one of the reasons why the show first caught my attention so early on. It wouldn’t have been surprising for the show to discard this particular string of narration after season one closed and stories were wrapped up neat and tidy so to continue to pursue it so far into its sophomore season is commendable.

Drug addiction is hardly ever dealt with in a manner befitting the disease but on this particular show it’s given the utmost attention and no matter how sloppy other stories may become, Sherlock’s battle with addiction and subsequent recovery remain in delicate, thoughtful hands……..

What would’ve the payoff been like had we’d been allowed to witness an interaction between Allistair and Sherlock before the former’s passing? Their relationship is one that lands in all of the pitfalls of telling not showing syndrome. We’re told how much Allistair cared for Sherlock, we’re told of their affection, of how Allistair was there for him when any other addict would find him a threat to their sobriety. However, the first face-to-face interaction that the friends have is after Allistair has already passed and Sherlock day-dreaming that he’s seeing him. It’s clear from the brief moments we share with these two that they have a capable chemistry and it just makes me wonder how powerful the character’s death could have been had we gotten to know him.

Ultimately, despite the death being more than anything a tool to refocus the story back on Sherlock’s sobriety it’s sold so well by Jonny Lee Miller that I’m hard pressed to nag all too much. Do I think that as an audience we require more insight into a character to be affected by their death? Yes. But I also think that Miller sold the grief and his onslaught of emotional conflicts so well that we care because Sherlock cares. Because at the end of the episode Sherlock is standing over the grave of one of his few friends, telling a ghost that he loves him and will always be missed.

- See more at: http://blastmagazine.com/entertainment/tv/elementary-lack-void-2x20-episode-review/#sthash.DNVL06Ry.dpuf

 




Apr/14/14
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"The Winter Soldier’s relationship with Alexander Pierce is a direct parallel to Steve’s relationship with Nick Fury. Steve is able to doubt Fury’s trustworthiness because he has a solid bedrock of moral certainty, but Bucky never had that luxury, even back when he was fully himself. Now, Bucky’s mind is a quicksand, and Pierce may be the only vaguely familiar face he knows. Having imprinted onto Pierce like a baby duckling, why not believe him when he says the Winter Soldier “shaped the century”? (Yet another parallel between Steve and Bucky, by the way: Captain America shaping the world as a heroic icon and comicbook character, while the Winter Soldier shapes things from the shadows, carrying out anonymous assassinations on behalf of HYDRA.)

The Winter Soldier’s facial expressions are almost childlike in the lab scene, and the way he passively accepts that mouth guard tells you everything you need to know. He could probably kill everyone in the room within seconds, but instead he just lies back and lets them torture his brain to mush for the hundredth time. Before now he seemed like such an intimidating figure, but this scene shows the Winter Soldier as what he really is: a little kid or a blank slate into which people insert their own goals and missions, fully-formed.

"But I knew him," he says in miserable confusion, sure that he recognises Steve’s face. But Pierce, the voice of God, refuses to explain any further. Sebastian Stan’s entire acting career of weeping while being emotionally abused by unpleasant father figures has all been leading up to this role, and I for one am not amused."

CATWS: The Tragedy of Bucky Barnes




Apr/14/14
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thetumblr-thisisatumblr:

enstarprise:

alegbra:

being 17 is weird because you can get hit on by 14-year-olds and 20-year-olds and it’s THE SAME AGE DIFFERENCE

image

It’s also weird because you can dance, you can jive, having the time of your life. You are the dancing queen, young and sweet, only seventeen




Apr/14/14
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scienceandeggs:

considering starting a series called “Community out of context”




Apr/14/14
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seraphknights:

cultureshift:

This is the Memorial to the Missing and contains over 50,000,000 pennies to represent the lives of each American child abandoned to abortion by a society and a culture that has embraced their destruction. We must prevent the need to add to this memorial. Take a stand. Get involved.
 ”How we treat the least of us defines us.”

"should I use this $500k to help struggling parents and pregnant people or should I put it in a glass box"

seraphknights:

cultureshift:

This is the Memorial to the Missing and contains over 50,000,000 pennies to represent the lives of each American child abandoned to abortion by a society and a culture that has embraced their destruction. We must prevent the need to add to this memorial. Take a stand. Get involved.

 ”How we treat the least of us defines us.”

"should I use this $500k to help struggling parents and pregnant people or should I put it in a glass box"




Apr/14/14
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sansasnarks:

what do you pray for, sansa?




Apr/14/14
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Martin Freeman’s got lots of wonderful quirks and talents. Many of which are on display in the film. But his most remarkable quality as an actor is to be able, with absolute clarity, to convey that he’s thinking two things at the same time. And you know as an audience what they are. And I wasn’t the only one on the set to say to himself later: “I wish I could act like that.” He has a palette of subtlety. And I thought, this is a new sort of acting that I’ve never seen before. — Sir Ian McKellen




Apr/14/14
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Apr/14/14
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Apr/14/14
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mickey-is-fucking-gay:

Mickey Milkovich + the word fuck




Apr/14/14
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Shameless (US) Season Two general thoughts

metamission:

So I finished the second season of Shameless. It’s still actually pretty good. Obviously this season had a different general feel than the first one. We sort of understand the Gallaghers and their situation more now so this season focused a lot more on the development of the characters at hand and it’s no secret that character development and plot continuity are the most important things to me in any form of media.

Read More




Apr/14/14
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Apr/14/14
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shameless challenge | [1/?] favorite scene(s)

Will you suck my dick whenever I want?




Apr/14/14
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Shameless (US) Season One Thoughts

metamission:

So I just finished the first season of Shameless and felt like I wanted to write on it because I am surprised at how much I actually liked it. The dynamic is very interesting and, dare I say it, the character development is amazing. Granted, it’s only been one season (for me) but I can already see some development. And that is the best thing. The writers actually trust in these characters to pull the plot instead of forcing them into a plot and making them feel out of character. And allowing them to grow and develop is amazing.

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Apr/13/14
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Title: Unknown
Artist: Unknown
Album: Unknown
Played: 132427 times

loveallthesherlocks:

macpye:

benedictatorship:

sherlox:

Doctor Who “Doomsday”/Sherlock theme song.

THIS IS TOTAL MINDFUCKERY

AND GENIUS

AND BEAUTY

AND TRAGEDY

AND GORGEOUSNESS

AND BRILLIANT BRILLIANT BRILLIANT

WHAT IS MY HEART DOING I CAN’T EVEN

image

 Dead